Mutable Function Parameters

Today I decided to take a look at the upcoming Swift 3.0 changes. If you are interested in reading about implemented proposals, please see Swift Evolution page on Github. This article is in addition to the article I wrote about Swift 2.2 changes that can be found here.

SE-0003: Removing var from Function Parameters – is the one I want to talk about. Function parameters, by default, are constants. However, it was possible to declare the parameter as a variable.

Continue reading “Mutable Function Parameters”

Mutable Function Parameters

Swift 2.2 Changes

Like everybody else, I spent a few hours this week updating my personal projects to Swift 2.2 which was released with Xcode 7.3 a few days ago. Updating to Swift 2.2 was important in my case since 2.2 version is basically an intermediate release between Swift 2.0 and the upcoming 3.0 version. This prompted me to take a few moments and write about the changes I had to implement in my code. There is a nice write up about the changes on www.swift.org if you are interested in more details.

Continue reading “Swift 2.2 Changes”

Swift 2.2 Changes

Richard Clarke on Apple vs. FBI

Former NSA official Richard Clarke on Apple vs FBI:

Well, I don’t think it’s a fierce debate. I think the Justice Department and the FBI are on their own here. You know, the secretary of defense has said how important encryption is when asked about this case. The National Security Agency director and three past National Security Agency directors, a former CIA director, a former Homeland Security secretary have all said that they’re much more sympathetic with Apple in this case. You really have to understand that the FBI director is exaggerating the need for this and is trying to build it up as an emotional case, organizing the families of the victims and all of that. And it’s Jim Comey and the attorney general is letting him get away with it.

…They want the precedent that the government can compel a computer device manufacturer to allow the government in.

…They’re (FBI and DoJ) not as interested in solving the problem as they are in getting a legal precedent.

Source: NPR

Richard Clarke on Apple vs. FBI

Two Reasons We Needed Swift

Swift needed to happen. Objective-C had no future. I know this is a harsh statement, but this is the conclusion I came to this week after writing purely in Swift for a few months now. It is hard to admit, especially after spending most of my software development career writing in Objective-C. There is a chance that a lot of you will disagree with this statement, but let me mention two things I find lacking in Objective-C that are extremely important when it comes to writing good code.

Objective-C by its nature is a much forgiving language (and I am using this term loosely). It allows developers to get away with bad code. It does not impose requirements for handling errors. It allows for nil return type where a specific type is expected. It does not guarantee immutability. It requires extra work to declare true constants. Block syntax (should I say more)?.

Continue reading “Two Reasons We Needed Swift”

Two Reasons We Needed Swift

ParseServer – AWS SSL Setup

For the past 2 weeks I’ve been spending my free time with ParseServer and AWS. You can read my previous article on how to setup it up here.

The awesome thing about ParseServer is that you can host it on AWS, Heroku, or your own server. Quite honestly, open source ParseServer is the best thing that ever happened to Parse.

AWS or even ParseServer might not be something big companies are interested in because they are most likely running their own cloud service. For smaller companies or developers like myself who are building apps in their free time just because, having a backend that’s secure, scalable and easy to setup is vital.

Continue reading “ParseServer – AWS SSL Setup”

ParseServer – AWS SSL Setup

ParseServer on AWS

I was pretty surprised at hearing about Parse shutting down. I was sure they are to stick around after being acquired by Facebook a few years back. I even built a few production apps that rely on their backend to work… oh well.

A few days ago I received an email “Your Own Parse Server on AWS and Heroku” and decided to give it a go by setting up ParseServe on AWS; after all, I only have 11 month to migrate my apps somewhere, right?.

This will be a short tutorial on how to deploy your own instance of ParseServer on AWS with a few Swift examples of making GET, POST requests. Quite honestly, I never worked with AWS until this week. My choice for backend was always Parse (ironically), most recently CloudKit (great solution provided by Apple), Heroku, or personal server running Node.js.

Continue reading “ParseServer on AWS”

ParseServer on AWS

in.notes 3.0

Monday is a great day to release new app updates. That’s exactly what we did today. Say hello to in.notes 3.0 – the app that my friend Monty and I both work on in our spare time; the app we have cool plans for.

in.notes is a full featured yet simple note-taking app that strips away complexity and allows you, the user, to concentrate on what’s truly important – content.

It is easy-to-use and free. It helps you to stay organized, save your ideas, and improve your productivity. You can take notes, capture photos, and create to-do lists with this amazing app.

Continue reading “in.notes 3.0”

in.notes 3.0